Pr. Sam Schuldheisz joins the show to discuss four practical ways to exercise the imagination.

Then (begins 22:22), Pr. Bramwell discusses how the bibliographical, internal evidence, and external evidence tests help us know whether or not we can trust what the New Testament says. How does the historical method answer the question of whether or not the New Testament is trustworthy?

 

(mp3, 54:20, 49.7 MB, 2021-Feb-15)

 



 

Part 1

 

Part 2 

In the last episode, we discussed the Wittenberg theologians' (mainly Luther and Melanchthon) gradual shift on their theological stance regarding offering not just disobedience to the governing authorities, but also resistance, and if necessary, armed resistance. In this episode of The Gottesdienst Crowd, we take up part two of what is now a three-part series. Here we dive into the events that happen after Luther's death, focusing on the events surrounding the city of Magdeburg and The Magdeburg Confession

Part 3


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Pr. Sean Daenzer discusses Teaching God’s Word at Home with Pr. Todd Wilken on Issues Etc.

(mp3, 35:24, 32.4 MB, 2021-Feb-05)

 



 

Pr. Sean Daenzer discusses Things We See in Church with Pr. Todd Wilken on Issues Etc.

1.

1. Part 1 (mp3, 57:35, 52.7 MB, 2020-Sept-25)

2. 

2. Part 2 (mp3, 57:34, 52.7 MB, 2020-Oct-15)

3. 

3. Part 3 (mp3, 1:12:08; 66.0 MB, 2020-Nov-05)

4. 

4. Part 4 (mp3, 1:19:48; 73.1 MB, 2020-Nov-19)

 



 

Part 1:

The times we are living in and through have raised a number of questions about the obedience we owe the government. We have begun again to wrestle with similar questions as the magisterial reformers, especially our Lutheran fathers in the faith: Luther, Melanchthon, Amsdorf, etc. To what extent should the governing authorities be obeyed? How are we to make those judgments? Is there a biblical and confessional framework for deciding these things? David Ramirez (pastor of St. Paul Lutheran Church, Union Grove, WI) will walk us through the history.

Part 2

Part 3


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250 This is enough of an explanation of what stealing is. Let the commandment not be understood too narrowly. But let it apply to everything that has to do with our neighbors. Briefly, in summary (as in the former commandments) this is what is forbidden: (a) To do our neighbor any injury or wrong (in any conceivable manner, by impeding, hindering, and withholding his possessions and property), or even to consent or allow such injury. Instead, we should interfere and prevent it. 251 (b) It is commanded that we advance and improve his possessions. When they suffer lack, we should help, share, and lend both to friends and foes [Matthew 5:42]. 252 Whoever now seeks and desires good works will find here more than enough to do that are heartily acceptable and pleasing to God. In addition, they are favored and crowned with excellent blessings. So we are to be richly compensated for all that we do for our neighbor’s good and from friendship.

Luther, Large Catechism I:250-252

 

After my sermon a couple of weeks ago, I was asked why I had referred to the government lockdown of businesses as stealing. To consider that, we must first reflect on the Seventh Commandment. In the Small Catechism, you learned that here God instructs you to protect the possessions and income that He has given to your neighbor. God desires that you be content with what He has given you and not scheme to take your neighbor’s property in a way that may appear right or in any dishonest way. Instead, He commands that you help and be of service to him in keeping it so that you improve and protect them. There are no exceptions to this, even in the case of the government or someone who feels like it is the right thing to do.

What is the connection to the lockdowns? Consider what the lockdowns have done. While large corporations, strip clubs, and casinos were kept open, many restaurants, bars, and small family-owned businesses have been crippled and forced to close. Owners had their businesses taken from them even though there was no proof that they were spreading the disease. They had to lay off employees, denying them wages. It was not the business, but the government that was stealing the wages. This leads to more stealing as taxes are increased on our neighbors. Work is good and holy under this commandment, but more people are once more living off the government instead of working for the good of our neighbors. Meanwhile, the government chooses to print money which leads to inflation and theft from our neighbor as prices escalate. Before COVID we were at record low unemployment, but lockdowns have forced people back under the umbrella of the government, closed legitimate businesses, and punished our neighbors. To quote Luther, the lockdowns have impeded, hindered and withheld our neighbor’s property.

The argument has been made that this will save lives, but the actual evidence is that depriving our neighbor of his business has not in any way slowed the spread or “saved a life.” States where the lockdowns are harshest have not slowed the number of cases. The actual fact is that people’s lives are being shattered, families are being torn apart because of financial tensions, drug and alcohol use has increased, and suicides are rising to all-time highs. Meanwhile, while I give thanks that we have not hindered people from supporting major corporations who employ our neighbors, we cannot condone the stealing from other neighbors. In the church, we must help our neighbor to improve and protect his property and business because it has been given to him by God. Let us speak up for our neighbor and protest the government selectively stealing from him.

Of course, stealing property and livelihoods has been coupled with stealing lives. Who has suffered the most from this? Who has had the most stolen from them?  The elderly, who have had their families stolen from them to “save lives.” Perhaps, the poor around the world who are being neglected while we who have so much are living in fear of a virus that 99+% of us will survive. And what about the children? Young children are not learning anything but fear and trembling as adults cannot smile and laugh with them, hug them, play with them, and when necessary express their disapproval. Children are not benefitting from in-person learning as many schools have closed. We push them into a bubble and forbid their interaction so that suicides increase. Surely, there are countless others who are falling between the cracks. Lord, grant that we repent of this behavior and wisdom finally prevails so that we once again recognize the importance of a free and open society if there is to be good for our neighbor.


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Part 1:

Part 2: 

Who are the men behind the liturgical renewals within our Synod? Who are the men at the tip of the spear when it came to talking about the importance of retaining the historic liturgy, rites, and ceremonies of the Western Church? The next installment of the liturgical biographies we're going to cover is Paul H.D. Lang. Mark Braden (pastor of Zion Evangelical Lutheran Church, Detroit, MI, and Departmental Editor of Gottesdienst: The Journal of Lutheran Liturgy) walks us through his early ministry, highlights some of his writings, and then dives into two of his most notable works: What An Altar Guild Should Know and Ceremony and Celebration.


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In my experience, preaching for the high feasts (Christmas, Holy Week, and Easter) are the most difficult. There is always that pull to bring out the best, to preach so that people will come back the next Sunday, to wow the crowd with your deep theological insights, high-sounding poetic words and rhetorical flourishes. In short, there's a pull to be cute and edgy. But when you read our forefathers' sermons for these days, they don't fall into this pit. They take seemingly simple biblical truths and open them up for the hearer to bask in their simple but profound glory. Dave Petersen (pastor of Redeemer Lutheran Church, Fort Wayne, IN, and Departmental Editor of Gottesdienst: the Journal of Lutheran Liturgy with his column "Commentary on the War") shows us how C.F.W. Walther preached one Christmas day. We look at this sermon and see the beauty in simplicity and the glory of God's truth in the well-known Gospel message.


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Divine Service Setting 3

Leading the Congregation

Kantor Kevin J. Hildebrand demonstrates techniques for leading the congregation.



The Bible is rich and deep in meaning. Every detail is important. And even the small details, the seemingly insignificant, one-off, in-passing details, provide insight into the deep truths of God. Larry Beane (pastor of Salem Lutheran Church, Gretna, LA, and Departmental Editor for Gottesdienst: the Journal of Lutheran Liturgy) walks us through the first book of the Bible tracing the steps of our fathers in the faith from well to well. What was the purpose of the well in the ancient world. How did they eventually begin to be seen? What in the New Testament church corresponds to these ancient wells? 


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One of the duties of the priests in the Old Testament was to distinguish the holy from the common, or as we would call it, the sacred from the secular. And they were given the task of teaching this distinction to the people. They did this not only in what they said but in what they did. It was communicated in how the tabernacle and temple were constructed. Everything surrounding the worship and daily life of the people of Israel focused on making this distinction. Fritz Eckardt (pastor of St. Paul's Evangelical Lutheran Church, Kewanee, IL, and Editor-in-Chief of Gottesdienst: The Journal of Lutheran Liturgy) takes up a similar task in looking at the sacred and secular at Christmas time. 


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Luther, in the Small and Large Catechisms on the Fourth Petition of the Lord's Prayer, lists "good friends" as necessary for bodily life. But we don't talk much about it. In this episode, Dave Petersen (pastor of Redeemer Lutheran Church, Fort Wayne, IN, and author of the recurring column "Commentary on the War" in the Gottesdienst Journal) and I discuss the factors that led to this deemphasis on friendship. Petersen looks to Aristotle, Cicero, and C.S. Lewis for aid in exploring this lost gift of God, and then we discuss how it might be restored among us. 


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In this Gottescast, The Gottesdienst Crowd discusses with Fritz Eckardt (Editor-in-Chief of Gottesdienst: The Journal of Lutheran Liturgy and pastor of St. Paul's Lutheran, Kewannee, IL) his series of articles in the print journal on the topic of the identity of the other Emmaus disciple.


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The Rev. Dr. Matthew C. Harrison, president of The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod, proclaims the Good Christmas News of Christ's coming in the manger, on the cross, in His Word and Sacraments, and on the Last Day. "These are the blessings of Advent and Christmas ... Christ comes, and He continues to come," says Pastor Harrison.

 

 

 



 

"Lord, Keep Us Steadfast in Thy Word"

The Bible is the very Word of God. It points to Jesus as the heart and center of Scripture and as the key to its true meaning. Of course, there are those who see the Bible as a book of myths or fables or merely as a book of rules. There are those who think that the concerns of our modern culture determine truth. But the Bible alone is the final determining factor in what we believe and teach.

God used human beings to write the Bible. God is the author behind the authors. Therefore, the Bible is accurate, truthful, and free of error. God created faith in us by speaking it into being through His Word. This same Word feeds and sustains faith in Christ. May we hold God’s Word sacred and may we gladly hear and learn it for it points us to Jesus and it brings us comfort and peace in Christ.

The Bible...Who is the Author? Is It Truthful and Free of Errors? -- Rev. Dr. Martin Nolan

 


Luther and the Bible -- Dr. Cameron MacKenzie

 


The Text of the Bible...Where Did It Come From? -- Dr. Cameron MacKenzie

 


The Bible...Is It Authoritative? Is It Clear? Is It Sufficient? -- Rev. Dr. Martin Nolan

 


Discussion Panel — Dr. Cameron MacKenzie & Dr. Martin Nolan

 



 

The North Texas Free Conference is held every year at Faith Lutheran Church in Plano, Texas. The conference addresses theological issues of the day from a biblical and confessional viewpoint. Many pastors and laymen from across Texas and beyond attend each year. The following recordings and videos are for the edification of the church at large and for the sake of the Gospel.

Is Justification Still the Issue?

What is the greatest threat to the church today? Is it the disintegration of the family? Is it the helter-skelter of the Church’s liturgy? Two devout Lutheran theologians present the case that justification is the article “on which the Church stands or falls.”

Was Paul a Lutheran? Current Issues Concerning the Doctrine of Justification - Part I - Prof. Roland Ziegler

 


The Centrality of Justification: Why this doctrine is still the article on which the Church stands or falls? - Part I — Pr. Rolf Preus

 


Was Paul a Lutheran? Current Issues Concerning the Doctrine of Justification - Part 2 - Prof. Roland Ziegler

 


The Centrality of Justification: Why this doctrine is still the article on which the Church stands or falls? - Part 2 — Pr. Rolf Preus

 


Discussion Panel — Prof. Roland Ziegler & Pr. Rolf Preus

 



 

The Second Sunday in Advent

(06 December 2020)

Isaiah 40:1–11; Ps. 85:1-13; 2 Peter 3:8–14; Mark 1:1–8

Hymn of Invocation
LSB 331 The Advent of Our King

 

Hymn of the Day
Savior of the nations, come (LSB 332)

 

Hymns for the Distribution of the Holy Communion
Once He came in blessing (LSB 333)


O Lord, how shall I meet You (LSB 334) (Catechetical Hymn)


Lift up your heads, ye mighty gates (LSB 340)


Jerusalem the golden (LSB 672)



Hymn of Departure
O Savior, rend the heavens wide (LSB 355)

 

You Are Prepared through Repentance for the Coming of the Lord

The gospel of Jesus Christ, the Son of God” (Mark 1:1) begins when John the Baptist appears and comes “proclaiming a baptism of repentance for the forgiveness of sins” (Mark 1:4). As the prophet Isaiah had written, John is the messenger of the Lord, sent before His face to prepare His way. To this day, the ministry of the forerunner continues in the preaching of the Law and the Gospel and in the Sacrament of Holy Baptism. By these ways and means, “the glory of the LORD shall be revealed, and all flesh shall see it together” (Is. 40:5), and the Good Shepherd “will gather the lambs in his arms” (Is. 40:11). He speaks “tenderly to Jerusalem,” and He comforts His people by pardoning their iniquity (Is. 40:1–2). What is more, He promises “new heavens and a new earth in which righteousness dwells” (2 Peter 3:13). Repent, therefore, and humble yourself as you wait for His coming in peace (2 Peter 3:14), because He “is patient toward you, not wishing that any should perish, but that all should reach repentance” (2 Peter 3:9).


Summary: LCMS

Hymns: Dr. Richard Stuckwisch


Pastors' Roundtable — John the Baptist Prepares the Way, — Issues Etc. Encore

Pr. Charlie Henrickson of St. Matthew Lutheran, Bonne Terre, Mo., and Pr. Shawn Kumm of Zion Lutheran, Laramie, WY, discuss the Gospel Lesson with Pr. Todd Wilken on Issues Etc. (mp3, 54:49, 22.0 MB, 2011-Dec-01)


Lectionary Podcast - Second Sunday in Advent - Dr. Peter Scaer

Dr. Peter Scaer, Concordia Theological Seminary, Ft. Wayne, Ind., discusses the Gospel Lesson from the Greek text. (22:59)


Mark 1:1–8 (SBLGNT)

1 Ἀρχὴ τοῦ εὐαγγελίου Ἰησοῦ ⸀χριστοῦ.

2 ⸀Καθὼς γέγραπται ἐν ⸂τῷ Ἠσαΐᾳ τῷ προφήτῃ⸃· ⸀Ἰδοὺ ἀποστέλλω τὸν ἄγγελόν μου πρὸ προσώπου σου, ὃς κατασκευάσει τὴν ὁδόν ⸀σου·

3 φωνὴ βοῶντος ἐν τῇ ἐρήμῳ· Ἑτοιμάσατε τὴν ὁδὸν κυρίου, εὐθείας ποιεῖτε τὰς τρίβους αὐτοῦ,

4 ἐγένετο Ἰωάννης ⸀ὁ βαπτίζων ἐν τῇ ⸀ἐρήμῳ κηρύσσων βάπτισμα μετανοίας εἰς ἄφεσιν ἁμαρτιῶν.

5 καὶ ἐξεπορεύετο πρὸς αὐτὸν πᾶσα ἡ Ἰουδαία χώρα καὶ οἱ Ἱεροσολυμῖται ⸂πάντες, καὶ ἐβαπτίζοντο⸃ ⸂ὑπʼ αὐτοῦ ἐν τῷ Ἰορδάνῃ ποταμῷ⸃ ἐξομολογούμενοι τὰς ἁμαρτίας αὐτῶν.

6 ⸂καὶ ἦν⸃ ὁ Ἰωάννης ἐνδεδυμένος τρίχας καμήλου καὶ ζώνην δερματίνην περὶ τὴν ὀσφὺν αὐτοῦ, καὶ ἔσθων ἀκρίδας καὶ μέλι ἄγριον.

7 καὶ ἐκήρυσσεν λέγων· Ἔρχεται ὁ ἰσχυρότερός μου ὀπίσω μου, οὗ οὐκ εἰμὶ ἱκανὸς κύψας λῦσαι τὸν ἱμάντα τῶν ὑποδημάτων αὐτοῦ·

8 ⸀ἐγὼ ἐβάπτισα ⸀ὑμᾶς ὕδατι, αὐτὸς δὲ βαπτίσει ὑμᾶς ⸀ἐν πνεύματι ἁγίῳ.


Literal Translation

(1)  The beginning of the gospel of Jesus Christ, the Son of God.

(2)  As it is written in Isaiah the prophet, “Behold, I send my messenger before your face, who will prepare your way,

(3)  the voice of one crying in the wilderness: ‘Prepare the way of the Lord, make his paths straight,’”

(4)  John appeared, baptizing in the wilderness and proclaiming a baptism of repentance for the forgiveness of sins.

(5)  And all the country of Judea and all Jerusalem were going out to him and were being baptized by him in the river Jordan, confessing their sins.

(6)  Now John was clothed with camel's hair and wore a leather belt around his waist and ate locusts and wild honey.

(7)  And he preached, saying, “After me comes he who is mightier than I, the strap of whose sandals I am not worthy to stoop down and untie.

(8)  I have baptized you with water, but he will baptize you with the Holy Spirit.”



Scripture quotations marked SBLGNT are from the SBL Greek New Testament. Copyright © 2010 Society of Biblical Literature and Logos Bible Software. Holmes, M. W. (2011–2013). The Greek New Testament: SBL Edition. Lexham Press; Society of Biblical Literature.



First Sunday In Advent

(29 November 2020)

Isaiah 64:1–9; Ps. 80:1–7; 1 Corinthians 1:3–9; Mark 11:1–10 or Mark 13:24–37

Hymn of Invocation
The advent of our King (LSB 331)



Hymn of the Day

LSB 332 Savior of the Nations, Come

 


Hymns for the Distribution of the Holy Communion

LSB 333 Once He Came in Blessing

 

O Lord, how shall I meet You (LSB 334) (Catechetical Hymn)

 

LSB 340 Lift Up Your Heads, Ye Mighty Gates

 


Jerusalem the golden (LSB 672)



Hymn of Departure
O Savior, rend the heavens wide (LSB 355)

  

The Lord Jesus Comes in Meekness and Humility to Save Us

Although we pray that God “would rend the heavens and come down” (Is. 64:1), that He would take vengeance against our enemies, we ourselves “have all become like one who is unclean, and all our righteous deeds are like a polluted garment” (Is. 64:6). We have continued in our sins for “a long time, and shall we be saved?” (Is. 64:5). Yet the Lord does not punish us in anger. He comes in voluntary meekness and humility to save us by His grace. Just as He once came into Jerusalem to sacrifice Himself for us upon the cross (Mark 11:4–8), He still comes to His Church with the fruits of His Passion. By His ministry of the Gospel, we are “enriched in him in all speech and all knowledge,” and so He will “sustain you to the end” (1 Cor. 1:5, 8). Although “heaven and earth will pass away,” His words “will not pass away” (Mark 13:31). As He sends disciples to call us to Himself in the fellowship of His Church, so will He “send out the angels” to gather us and all of His elect “from the ends of the earth” to Himself in heaven forever (Mark 13:27)


Summary: LCMS

Hymns: Dr. Richard Stuckwisch


Football, Falling Stars, and Christ’s Prophetic Lingo: Thinking Like a Prophet about Mark 13:24-27 - Chad Bird

 

Pastors' Roundtable — "No One Knows the Day or the Hour" Mark 13:24-37 — Issues Etc.

Pr. Tim Rossow of Bethany Lutheran, Naperville, Ill., and Pr. Mark Nebel of St. John Lutheran, Red Bud, Ill., discuss the Gospel Lesson with Pr. Todd Wilken on Issues Etc. (mp3, 57:20, 23.4 MB, 2012-Nov-20)


Lectionary Podcast - First Sunday in Advent - Dr. Arthur A. Just Jr.

Dr. Arthur A. Just Jr., Concordia Theological Seminary, Ft. Wayne, Ind., discusses Mark 11:1–10 from the Greek text.


Looking Forward to Sunday Morning (3 Year Lectionary): First Sunday in Advent — Dr. Carl Fickenscher — Issues Etc.

Dr. Carl Fickenscher, Concordia Theological Seminary, Ft. Wayne, Ind., discusses the readings and propers with Pr. Todd Wilken on Issues Etc. (mp3, 56:36, 51.8 MB, 2017-Nov-28)


Mark 13:24-37 (SBLGNT)

24 Ἀλλὰ ἐν ἐκείναις ταῖς ἡμέραις μετὰ τὴν θλῖψιν ἐκείνην ὁ ἥλιος σκοτισθήσεται, καὶ ἡ σελήνη οὐ δώσει τὸ φέγγος αὐτῆς,

25 καὶ οἱ ἀστέρες ⸂ἔσονται ἐκ τοῦ οὐρανοῦ πίπτοντες⸃, καὶ αἱ δυνάμεις αἱ ἐν τοῖς οὐρανοῖς σαλευθήσονται.

26 καὶ τότε ὄψονται τὸν υἱὸν τοῦ ἀνθρώπου ἐρχόμενον ἐν νεφέλαις μετὰ δυνάμεως πολλῆς καὶ δόξης·

27 καὶ τότε ἀποστελεῖ τοὺς ⸀ἀγγέλους καὶ ἐπισυνάξει τοὺς ⸀ἐκλεκτοὺς ἐκ τῶν τεσσάρων ἀνέμων ἀπʼ ἄκρου γῆς ἕως ἄκρου οὐρανοῦ.

28 Ἀπὸ δὲ τῆς συκῆς μάθετε τὴν παραβολήν· ὅταν ⸂ἤδη ὁ κλάδος αὐτῆς⸃ ἁπαλὸς γένηται καὶ ἐκφύῃ τὰ φύλλα, γινώσκετε ὅτι ἐγγὺς τὸ θέρος ἐστίν·

29 οὕτως καὶ ὑμεῖς, ὅταν ⸂ἴδητε ταῦτα⸃ γινόμενα, γινώσκετε ὅτι ἐγγύς ἐστιν ἐπὶ θύραις.

30 ἀμὴν λέγω ὑμῖν ὅτι οὐ μὴ παρέλθῃ ἡ γενεὰ αὕτη μέχρις οὗ ⸂ταῦτα πάντα⸃ γένηται.

31 ὁ οὐρανὸς καὶ ἡ γῆ ⸀παρελεύσονται, οἱ δὲ λόγοι μου οὐ ⸀μὴ ⸁παρελεύσονται.

32 Περὶ δὲ τῆς ἡμέρας ἐκείνης ἢ ⸀τῆς ὥρας οὐδεὶς οἶδεν, οὐδὲ οἱ ἄγγελοι ⸀ἐν οὐρανῷ οὐδὲ ὁ υἱός, εἰ μὴ ὁ πατήρ.

33 βλέπετε ⸀ἀγρυπνεῖτε, οὐκ οἴδατε γὰρ πότε ὁ καιρός ἐστιν·

34 ὡς ἄνθρωπος ἀπόδημος ἀφεὶς τὴν οἰκίαν αὐτοῦ καὶ δοὺς τοῖς δούλοις αὐτοῦ τὴν ἐξουσίαν, ⸀ἑκάστῳ τὸ ἔργον αὐτοῦ, καὶ τῷ θυρωρῷ ἐνετείλατο ἵνα γρηγορῇ.

35 γρηγορεῖτε οὖν, οὐκ οἴδατε γὰρ πότε ὁ κύριος τῆς οἰκίας ἔρχεται, ⸀ἢ ὀψὲ ἢ ⸀μεσονύκτιον ἢ ἀλεκτοροφωνίας ἢ πρωΐ,

36 μὴ ἐλθὼν ἐξαίφνης εὕρῃ ὑμᾶς καθεύδοντας·

37 ⸀ὃ δὲ ὑμῖν λέγω πᾶσιν λέγω· γρηγορεῖτε.


Literal Translation

(24)  “But in those days, after that tribulation, the sun will be darkened, and the moon will not give its light,

(25)  and the stars will be falling from heaven, and the powers in the heavens will be shaken.

(26)  And then they will see the Son of Man coming in clouds with great power and glory.

(27)  And then he will send out the angels and gather his elect from the four winds, from the ends of the earth to the ends of heaven.

(28)  “From the fig tree learn its lesson: as soon as its branch becomes tender and puts out its leaves, you know that summer is near.

(29)  So also, when you see these things taking place, you know that he is near, at the very gates.

(30)  Truly, I say to you, this generation will not pass away until all these things take place.

(31)  Heaven and earth will pass away, but my words will not pass away.

(32)  “But concerning that day or that hour, no one knows, not even the angels in heaven, nor the Son, but only the Father.

(33)  Be on guard, keep awake. For you do not know when the time will come.

(34)  It is like a man going on a journey, when he leaves home and puts his servants in charge, each with his work, and commands the doorkeeper to stay awake.

(35)  Therefore stay awake—for you do not know when the master of the house will come, in the evening, or at midnight, or when the rooster crows, or in the morning—

(36)  lest he come suddenly and find you asleep.

(37)  And what I say to you I say to all: Stay awake.”


Scripture quotations marked SBLGNT are from the SBL Greek New Testament. Copyright © 2010 Society of Biblical Literature and Logos Bible Software. Holmes, M. W. (2011–2013). The Greek New Testament: SBL Edition. Lexham Press; Society of Biblical Literature.



Day of National Thanksgiving

(November 26)

Deuteronomy 8:1–10; Ps. 67:1-7; Philippians 4:6–20 or 1 Timothy 2:1–4; Luke 17:11–19

Processional Hymn
Evening and morning (LSB 726)


Hymn of the Day

LSB 785 We Praise You, O God



Hymns for the Distribution of the Holy Communion
Sing praise to God, the highest good (LSB 819)

 


Entrust your days and burdens (LSB 754)

 


Praise to the Lord, the Almighty (LSB 790)



Processional Out

LSB 895 Now Thank We All Our God

 

 

We Praise God for Sustaining Life in and through His Word

The nation resounds with thanksgiving for the earth’s bountiful harvest, crops of wheat and grains, all beneath the canopy of God’s almighty care. But “man does not live by bread alone, but man lives by every word that comes from the mouth of the Lord” (Deut. 8:1–10). The Church is the vessel through which the Word of God penetrates the world with its Law and Gospel. It is this divine Word which proclaims Jesus as the sole source of life, health, and wholeness. It is Jesus who heals lepers with His Word, “Go show yourselves to the priests” (Luke 17:11–19). Of the ten cleansed, only one expresses thanksgiving back to Jesus. But true gratitude proceeds from a heart sustained by faith. Jesus bids this one Samaritan to “rise and go your way; your faith has made you well.” So also, we are sent from the Divine Service, bolstered in our faith by Baptismal and Eucharist blessing to be thankful in our circumstances of plenty and hunger, abundance and need (Phil. 4:6–20).


Summary: LCMS

Hymns: Dr. Richard Stuckwisch


Jesus Heals the Ten Lepers — Pastors Roundtable — Issues Etc.

Pastor Charles Lehmann of St. John Lutheran, Accident, Md., and Pastor Brian Holle of Messiah Lutheran, Lebanon, Ill, discuss the healing of the ten lepers with Pr. Todd Wilken on Issues Etc. (mp3, 54:25, 21.8 MB, 2011-Sept-22)


Liturgy for a Day of Thanksgiving — Pr. David Petersen — Issues Etc.

Pastor David Peterson, Redeemer Lutheran, Ft. Wayne, Ind., discusses the liturgy for Thanksgiving Day with Pr. Todd Wilken on Issues Etc. (mp3, 57:19, 36.2 MB, 2016-Nov-24)


Luke 17:11-19 (SBLGNT)

11 Καὶ ἐγένετο ἐν τῷ ⸀πορεύεσθαι εἰς Ἰερουσαλὴμ καὶ αὐτὸς διήρχετο διὰ ⸀μέσον Σαμαρείας καὶ Γαλιλαίας.

12 καὶ εἰσερχομένου αὐτοῦ εἴς τινα κώμην ⸀ἀπήντησαν δέκα λεπροὶ ἄνδρες, οἳ ⸀ἔστησαν πόρρωθεν,

13 καὶ αὐτοὶ ἦραν φωνὴν λέγοντες Ἰησοῦ ἐπιστάτα, ἐλέησον ἡμᾶς.

14 καὶ ἰδὼν εἶπεν αὐτοῖς Πορευθέντες ἐπιδείξατε ἑαυτοὺς τοῖς ἱερεῦσιν. καὶ ἐγένετο ἐν τῷ ὑπάγειν αὐτοὺς ἐκαθαρίσθησαν.

15 εἷς δὲ ἐξ αὐτῶν, ἰδὼν ὅτι ἰάθη, ὑπέστρεψεν μετὰ φωνῆς μεγάλης δοξάζων τὸν θεόν,

16 καὶ ἔπεσεν ἐπὶ πρόσωπον παρὰ τοὺς πόδας αὐτοῦ εὐχαριστῶν αὐτῷ καὶ αὐτὸς ἦν Σαμαρίτης.

17 ἀποκριθεὶς δὲ ὁ Ἰησοῦς εἶπεν ⸀Οὐχὶ οἱ δέκα ἐκαθαρίσθησαν; οἱ δὲ ἐννέα ποῦ;

18 οὐχ εὑρέθησαν ὑποστρέψαντες δοῦναι δόξαν τῷ θεῷ εἰ μὴ ὁ ἀλλογενὴς οὗτος;

19 καὶ εἶπεν αὐτῷ Ἀναστὰς πορεύου ἡ πίστις σου σέσωκέν σε.


Literal Translation

(11)  And it happened in His going to Jerusalem even He passed through the midst of Samaria and Galilee.

(12)  And He entering into a certain village, ten leprous men met Him, who stood afar off.

(13)  And they lifted their voice, saying, Jesus, Master, pity us.

(14)  And seeing them, He said to them, Going, show yourselves to the priests. And it happened in their going they were cleansed.

(15)  And one of them, seeing that he was cured, returned glorifying God with a loud voice.

(16)  And he fell on his face at His feet, thanking Him. And he was a Samaritan.

(17)  And answering, Jesus said, Were not the ten cleansed? But where are the nine?

(18)  Were not any found returning to give glory to God except this foreigner?

(19)  And He said to him, Rising up, go! Your faith has cured you.


Scripture quotations marked SBLGNT are from the SBL Greek New Testament. Copyright © 2010 Society of Biblical Literature and Logos Bible Software. Holmes, M. W. (2011–2013). The Greek New Testament: SBL Edition. Lexham Press; Society of Biblical Literature.



The Last Sunday of the Church Year

Proper 29 (November 20-26)

Ezekiel 34:11–16, 20–24; Ps. 95:1-7; 1 Corinthians 15:20–28; Matthew 25:31–46

Processional Hymn / Hymn of Invocation
Let all mortal flesh keep silence (LSB 621)


Hymn of the Day
LSB 532 The Head That Once Was Crowned with Thorns

 

Hymns for the Distribution of the Holy Communion
Wide open stand the gates (LSB 639)


At the name of Jesus (LSB 512)

 


O Morning Star, how fair and bright (LSB 395)


Sing with all the saints in glory (LSB 671)



Processional Out / Hymn of Departure / Catechetical Hymn
For all the saints who from their labors rest (LSB 677)

 

By the Cross of Christ We Enter the Kingdom of Our God and Father

When the crucified and risen Lord Jesus comes to judge the living and the dead, “He will separate people one from another as a shepherd separates the sheep from the goats” (Matt. 25:32). “To those on His right,” who have been crucified and raised with Him through repentance and faith in His Gospel, He will grant the blessed Kingdom of His Father (Matt. 25:34). Having been justified by His grace, they live unto righteousness in Him (Matt. 25:35–40). But “those on His left,” who trust in themselves and despise their neighbor, will depart “into the eternal fire prepared for the devil and his angels” (Matt. 25:41). Until that day, the Lord searches for His sheep “as a shepherd seeks out his flock” (Ezek. 34:11–12). Through His preaching of repentance He disciplines the proud sheep and goats, “the fat and the strong,” but through the preaching of forgiveness He rescues the lost, binds up the injured, strengthens the weak, and feeds “the lean sheep” (Ezek. 34:16, 20). In this way, He destroys the power of death in the children of Adam by His Cross, so that “in Christ shall all be made alive” by His Resurrection (1 Cor. 15:20–26).


Summary: LCMS

Hymns: Dr. Richard Stuckwisch


Who’s Afraid of the Final Judgment?

Goats, Sheep, and the Genesis Gospel in Matthew 25 - Chad Bird

 

Looking Forward to Sunday Morning (3 Year Lectionary): Last Sunday of the Church Year — Dr. Carl Fickenscher — Issues Etc.

Dr. Carl Fickenscher, Concordia Theological Seminary, Ft. Wayne, Ind., discusses the readings and propers with Pr. Todd Wilken on Issues Etc. (mp3, 1:10:19, 64.4 MB, 2017-Nov-20)


Matthew 25:31-46, The Final Judgment, Pastors’ Roundtable -- Issues, Etc.

Pr. Kevin Golden of Village Lutheran, Ladue, Mo., and Pr. Dan Kistler of Our Savior Lutheran, Pacifica, Calif., discuss the Gospel lesson with Pr. Todd Wilken (mp3, 54:29, 21.9 MB, 2011-Nov-17)


Lectionary Podcast - Last Sunday of the Church Year - Matthew 25:31–46 with Dr. John G. Nordling

Dr. John G. Nordling, Concordia Theological Seminary, Ft. Wayne, Ind., discusses the Gospel lesson from the Greek text.


Matthew 25:31-46 (SBLGNT)

31 Ὅταν δὲ ἔλθῃ ὁ υἱὸς τοῦ ἀνθρώπου ἐν τῇ δόξῃ αὐτοῦ καὶ πάντες ⸀οἱ ἄγγελοι μετʼ αὐτοῦ, τότε καθίσει ἐπὶ θρόνου δόξης αὐτοῦ·

32 καὶ ⸀συναχθήσονται ἔμπροσθεν αὐτοῦ πάντα τὰ ἔθνη, καὶ ἀφορίσει αὐτοὺς ἀπʼ ἀλλήλων, ὥσπερ ὁ ποιμὴν ἀφορίζει τὰ πρόβατα ἀπὸ τῶν ἐρίφων,

33 καὶ στήσει τὰ μὲν πρόβατα ἐκ δεξιῶν αὐτοῦ τὰ δὲ ἐρίφια ἐξ εὐωνύμων.

34 τότε ἐρεῖ ὁ βασιλεὺς τοῖς ἐκ δεξιῶν αὐτοῦ· Δεῦτε, οἱ εὐλογημένοι τοῦ πατρός μου, κληρονομήσατε τὴν ἡτοιμασμένην ὑμῖν βασιλείαν ἀπὸ καταβολῆς κόσμου.

35 ἐπείνασα γὰρ καὶ ἐδώκατέ μοι φαγεῖν, ἐδίψησα καὶ ἐποτίσατέ με, ξένος ἤμην καὶ συνηγάγετέ με,

36 γυμνὸς καὶ περιεβάλετέ με, ἠσθένησα καὶ ἐπεσκέψασθέ με, ἐν φυλακῇ ἤμην καὶ ἤλθατε πρός με.

37 τότε ἀποκριθήσονται αὐτῷ οἱ δίκαιοι λέγοντες· Κύριε, πότε σε εἴδομεν πεινῶντα καὶ ἐθρέψαμεν, ἢ διψῶντα καὶ ἐποτίσαμεν;

38 πότε δέ σε εἴδομεν ξένον καὶ συνηγάγομεν, ἢ γυμνὸν καὶ περιεβάλομεν;

39 πότε δέ σε εἴδομεν ⸀ἀσθενοῦντα ἢ ἐν φυλακῇ καὶ ἤλθομεν πρός σε;

40 καὶ ἀποκριθεὶς ὁ βασιλεὺς ἐρεῖ αὐτοῖς· Ἀμὴν λέγω ὑμῖν, ἐφʼ ὅσον ἐποιήσατε ἑνὶ τούτων τῶν ἀδελφῶν μου τῶν ἐλαχίστων, ἐμοὶ ἐποιήσατε.

41 τότε ἐρεῖ καὶ τοῖς ἐξ εὐωνύμων· Πορεύεσθε ἀπʼ ἐμοῦ ⸀οἱ κατηραμένοι εἰς τὸ πῦρ τὸ αἰώνιον τὸ ἡτοιμασμένον τῷ διαβόλῳ καὶ τοῖς ἀγγέλοις αὐτοῦ.

42 ἐπείνασα γὰρ καὶ οὐκ ἐδώκατέ μοι φαγεῖν, ⸀ἐδίψησα καὶ οὐκ ἐποτίσατέ με,

43 ξένος ἤμην καὶ οὐ συνηγάγετέ με, γυμνὸς καὶ οὐ περιεβάλετέ με, ἀσθενὴς καὶ ἐν φυλακῇ καὶ οὐκ ἐπεσκέψασθέ με.

44 τότε ἀποκριθήσονται καὶ αὐτοὶ λέγοντες· Κύριε, πότε σε εἴδομεν πεινῶντα ἢ διψῶντα ἢ ξένον ἢ γυμνὸν ἢ ἀσθενῆ ἢ ἐν φυλακῇ καὶ οὐ διηκονήσαμέν σοι;

45 τότε ἀποκριθήσεται αὐτοῖς λέγων· Ἀμὴν λέγω ὑμῖν, ἐφʼ ὅσον οὐκ ἐποιήσατε ἑνὶ τούτων τῶν ἐλαχίστων, οὐδὲ ἐμοὶ ἐποιήσατε.

46 καὶ ἀπελεύσονται οὗτοι εἰς κόλασιν αἰώνιον, οἱ δὲ δίκαιοι εἰς ζωὴν αἰώνιον.


Literal Translation

(31)  But when the Son of Man comes in His glory, and all the holy angels with Him, then He will sit on the throne of His glory.

(32)  And before Him shall be gathered all the nations; and He will separate them from one another, as the shepherd separates the sheep from the goats.

(33)  And indeed He will set the sheep off His right, but the goats off the left hand.

(34)  Then the King will say to those on His right, Come, the blessed of My Father, inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world.

(35)  For I hungered, and you gave Me food to eat; I thirsted, and you gave Me drink; I was a stranger, and you took Me in;

(36)  naked, and you clothed Me; I was sick, and you visited Me; I was in prison, and you came to Me.

(37)  Then the righteous will answer, saying, Lord, when did we see You hungry, and fed You; or thirsting, and gave You drink?

(38)  And when did we see You a stranger, and took You in; or naked, and clothed You?

(39)  And when did we see You sick, or in prison, and came to You?

(40)  And answering, the King will say to them, Truly I say to you, In so far as you did it to one of these, the least of My brothers, you did it to Me.

(41)  Then He will also say to those on His left, Go away from Me, cursed ones, into the everlasting fire having been prepared for the Devil and his angels.

(42)  For I hungered, and you did not give Me a thing to eat. I thirsted and you did not give Me a thing to drink;

(43)  I was a stranger, and you did not take Me in; naked, and you did not clothe Me; sick, and in prison, and you did not visit Me.

(44)  Then they also will answer Him, saying, Lord, when did we see You hungering, or thirsting, or a stranger, or naked, or sick, or in prison, and did not minister to You?

(45)  Then He will answer them, saying, Truly I say to you, In so far as you did not do it to one of these, the least, neither did you do it to Me.

(46)  And these shall go away into everlasting punishment, but the righteous into everlasting life.


Scripture quotations marked SBLGNT are from the SBL Greek New Testament. Copyright © 2010 Society of Biblical Literature and Logos Bible Software. Holmes, M. W. (2011–2013). The Greek New Testament: SBL Edition. Lexham Press; Society of Biblical Literature.